Water Park & Prosthesis Question (2022)

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Earning My Ears
  • Oct 18, 2010
  • #1

Greetings to all,

I just had my right leg amputated (below the knee) this past July. Just received my prosthetic leg this past week and life is good. Water Park & Prosthesis Question (1) Now I'm not anticipating many issues but I did notice that there are restrictions in the water parks for guests with a prosthetic limb. Anyone know or have any experience with this. I'm assuming Disney is concerned about damage to the slides or injury to other guests. I'm hoping I can adjust for the concern as I love to visit the water parks.

Mary976

DIS Veteran
  • Oct 18, 2010
  • #2

I also wonder if they are worried the leg could "catch" on the slide and injure you? For example, they don't allow aqua socks (water shoes) to be worn on the body slide. The lifeguard said it was because the rubber could catch on the slide and then you could injure yourself. If that is a concern, it may only be for the body slides and not for the tube slides or lazy river. Hopefully someone here will have first hand experience and can give you a better idea of what's possible,

Good luck!
Mary

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POOHsie

DIS Veteran
  • Oct 19, 2010
  • #3

I have a prosthetic leg for an above the knee amputation. I discussed the prosthetic for water use with the prosthetic company. Basically I was told it would subject the prosthetic to damage to use it in water. Since my insurance paid for the prosthetic, I feel obligated to use it properly or risk ruining it and not getting a replacement paid for. I believe there are special prosthetics that can be acquired for water use, but just not your regular one. You need to discuss this with your prosthetic provider. From the standpoint of a slide at Disney or elsewhere, even a waterproof prosthetic couldn't be used, because it could catch on the sides of the slide and injure you worse that you already are (knee injury, broken bones).

If you cannot wear your prosthetic, this will severely limit you to the lazy river using the bump steps, or the wave pool with a water-wheelchair. Here is a picture of bump step access to the pool at Old Key West Resort. My resort, Port Orleans Riverside, also has bump step access to their pool.

Water Park & Prosthesis Question (4)

Here is a picture of a water wheelchair at SSR. This is a zero-entry pool.

Water Park & Prosthesis Question (5)

I think Blizzard Beach has a handicap accessible slide, but it involves having a second person from your party at the bottom of the slide to assist you at the end of the slide. And someone would have to fetch your wheelchair from the top of the ride.

That's pretty much it for water parks and amputated legs. Not much there, but better than nothing. I believe the water parks have wheelchairs available for those who need them, first come-first served. Same with your resort. If your resort has bump step access to the pool at no charge, it is questionable spending $50 for a day at the water park with a leg amputation, unless you are there to enjoy yourself with a group of friends/family.

C

carj

DIS Veteran
  • Oct 20, 2010
  • #4

My son has worn a prosthethic leg since the day befor his first birthday. He's 9 now. I definitely want to encourage you to get out there and enjoy everything you can.

The previous poster is right about water damage. My son wears his "old" leg when we go to waterparks. I think that you should definitely consult your prosthetist about wearing it in the water. My son outgrows his legs about every 9-18 months so we always have an old one that fits but isn't a good fit. It is very hard on the feet. We lose toes every summer!Water Park & Prosthesis Question (6)

With that said, he does everything he wants at waterparks. We haven't visited the WDW waterparks but many others here in Texas.

The only time I have seen ride restrictions for him are in situations where he might dangle and the prosthesis can come off. At this point, he has decided that removing the prosthesis to ride those attractions is not worth it.

Are you interested in athletic events for disabled athletes? There is an organization that offers assistance in obtaining specialized equipment for disabled athletes. (like a swimming leg) You don't have to be a world classs competitor, just someone with the desire to be involved in athletic activities.

(Video) Amputees find lasting solution to an old prosthesis problem at UCHealth

I don't want to discourage you AT ALL from having fun in the waterparks, but I would hate for you to damage your prosthesis and then be stuck with it for a while.

Please feel free to PM with any questions! Water Park & Prosthesis Question (7)

SueM in MN

combining the teacups with a roller coaster
  • Oct 20, 2010
  • #5

If you are interested in going to a resort with a zero entry pool, post #17 of the disABILITIES FAQs thread has information about those pools. Most of the resorts have at least one pool with bump steps.

Post #3 of the disABILITIES FAQs thread has links to the Guidebook for Guests with Disabilities for each of the WDW water parks. There is not much specific information, for example, it says, "Certain restrictions apply to Guests using a prosthesis on some of the water slides at Disney's Blizzard Beach Water Park. A separate information sheet is available at Guest Services to provide information specific to these needs."
(It says the same thing for Typhoon Lagoon).
I have not seen the information sheet, so can't help you with what the restrictions are, but I agree with the other posters that in some cases, restrictions will be to protect the slide from damage, in some it may be to protect you or other guests from injury and in some cases, it will be all those reasons.

Blizzard Beach is a little more accessible, since the lazy river has accessible entrances in several places, not just one like Typhoon Lagoon. But, both parks have water slides that are not accessible by wheelchair since they include stairs (and if you can't wear the prosthesis, you may not be able to get there even if you can move around without the wheelchair).

T

Tinker Bell Fan

DIS Veteran
  • Oct 21, 2010
  • #6

DH recently (July) had to have his left leg amputated (above the knee) so we are new to dealing with a prosthetic (though he hasn't gotten one yet due to the fact that he fell and reopened his incision and we're waiting for that to heal). Water Park & Prosthesis Question (9) He plain ol' forgot he didn't have a leg one day and as he held onto his walker turned, let go (to walk) and bam! fell over. At least the area did not get infected!

Anyway, he should have a leg by Christmas (we hope) and we're planning on going to WDW in April. We talked about going to the pool (we're not waterpark type of folks) and I saw this thread and started to read it - it dawned on me - we hadn't thought about the prosthetic and the pool! So thank you for bringing that to my/our attention! We'll definitely talk to our prosthetic guy (or as he refers to himself as "the leg man").

Thanks!

POOHsie

DIS Veteran
  • Oct 21, 2010
  • #7

Tinker Bell Fan said:

DH recently (July) had to have his left leg amputated (above the knee) so we are new to dealing with a prosthetic (though he hasn't gotten one yet due to the fact that he fell and reopened his incision and we're waiting for that to heal). Water Park & Prosthesis Question (11) He plain ol' forgot he didn't have a leg one day and as he held onto his walker turned, let go (to walk) and bam! fell over. At least the area did not get infected!

Anyway, he should have a leg by Christmas (we hope) and we're planning on going to WDW in April. We talked about going to the pool (we're not waterpark type of folks) and I saw this thread and started to read it - it dawned on me - we hadn't thought about the prosthetic and the pool! So thank you for bringing that to my/our attention! We'll definitely talk to our prosthetic guy (or as he refers to himself as "the leg man").

Thanks!

I fell for the same reason soon after my amputation. It takes some adjustment to life without one of your legs. If he gets a C-leg prosthetic with a tiny computer in it, there's no taking it in the water. My starter prosthetic, before my C-leg, had lots of metal parts and was not built for water use (will rust). The bump steps I have pictured above, which is a platform at wheelchair height, with steps down into the water, will enable your DH to "walk his butt" in and out of the resort pool, if your resort pool has this. Not every pool does. That is something to consider when choosing a resort. The swimming pool will do your DH much good, as sometimes amputees don't exercise much and get soft. Of course, you are yet to know how DH will take to walking. I could never get my balance, and usually use a mobility scooter, or my walker for quick walks. You may have to consider renting a mobility scooter, too. WDW is miles of walking. Also, you should ask for a handicap room with a roll-in shower. It has a bigger bathroom with much easier access to the shower with a wheelchair or scooter. Also, the shower has a seat and a personal sprayer shower head. Write back as your trip approaches. Good luck.

(Video) Can I Swim With My Prosthesis

C

carj

DIS Veteran
  • Oct 21, 2010
  • #8

Tinker Bell Fan said:

DH recently (July) had to have his left leg amputated (above the knee) so we are new to dealing with a prosthetic (though he hasn't gotten one yet due to the fact that he fell and reopened his incision and we're waiting for that to heal). Water Park & Prosthesis Question (12) He plain ol' forgot he didn't have a leg one day and as he held onto his walker turned, let go (to walk) and bam! fell over. At least the area did not get infected!

Anyway, he should have a leg by Christmas (we hope) and we're planning on going to WDW in April. We talked about going to the pool (we're not waterpark type of folks) and I saw this thread and started to read it - it dawned on me - we hadn't thought about the prosthetic and the pool! So thank you for bringing that to my/our attention! We'll definitely talk to our prosthetic guy (or as he refers to himself as "the leg man").

Thanks!

An above the knee prosthesis usually has more moving and metal parts and I think swimming with it would be out.

Also, my 9 year old can swim while wearing his old prosthesis, but it isn't great for that. It's heavy!

For the pool, he wears it until we get there and then swims without it. He can weight bear very well on his residual limb. He can enter and exit the pool without any trouble.

The original question was for a below the knee amputee at the waterparks. He wears his leg and does every ride that he chooses. We have not been to the WDW waterparks but to local large parks and Great Wolf Lodge. He has never been denied access. He isn't too adventurous in water though so there may be some out there!Water Park & Prosthesis Question (13)

Another problem that we have after swimming is that it is hard to put the prosthesis on a wet limb. It seems like even when it feels dry, he drips water from his swimsuit and then the sock is hard to put on. For that reason, I think that taking it off and then putting it back on for a slide would be inconvenient.

I have wondered about swimming with the sharks at WDW with a prosthesis. It seems like I read something that made me wonder if he would have to remove it to do that. I'm going to follow this thread and see what some of you all discover too! Water Park & Prosthesis Question (14)

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D

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Earning My Ears
  • Oct 26, 2010
  • #9

Thanks for the feedback. I love the water so that was one of my first questions for prosthetic tech. My leg is titanium and carbon fiber and I use a sleeve suspension system instead of the pin system. This provides a water tight fit so there are no problems with getting it wet. My biggest concern (if it is a concern) was being aloud to go down the water slides. I love the water parks so I guess I'll have to wait and see what the rules are for slides. I guess I could always use the crutches to the top then have someone bring them to the bottom but that's no fun for the person who has to run the crutches back and forth. It will be fun regardless. Water Park & Prosthesis Question (15)

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FAQs

Can people with prosthetic legs go in water? ›

Many prosthetic components, such as feet and knees, are water-resistant, meaning that it's okay to be caught in a rain storm or splash water on them without causing damage. Some components are entirely waterproof, meaning it's okay to completely submerge them in water.

Can you wear a prosthetic on a roller coaster? ›

Amusement parks may also use these guidelines to require riders to remove medical devices, including prosthetic devices. These devices may prevent safety restraints from working as designed, which can keep the rider from maintaining proper riding posture, and present a hazard to the individual or other riders.

Can people with prosthetics swim? ›

As you probably know, swimming with your regular prosthetic or a water-resistant prosthetic is not a good idea since they are predisposed to damage and rust.

What is the most common problem with today's prosthetics? ›

Overuse syndrome is well documented in amputees, where additional and atypical amounts of time and pressure are borne down through the intact limb. Over time, this can and will cause early degeneration of the lower back, hip, knee and ankle resulting in discomfort and other complications.

How much is a waterproof prosthetic leg? ›

Even though there are some waterproof prosthetic legs on the market, the cost is very high. To customize a lower extremity prosthesis can range in cost from $5,000 to $50,000 depending on needs. Amputees are barely willing to purchase an extra one only for shower.

Can you walk on the beach with a prosthetic leg? ›

Amputees can enjoy the ocean when they travel to the beach too, even while wearing their prosthetic leg. Like Jodie says, “It feels great enjoying the beach more fully!” Computerized prosthetics might not be waterproof, but amputee travelers can still enjoy dipping toes in the water.

Can you ride a roller coaster with one leg? ›

What is this? There is no way a ride operator can be trained on all the different kinds of leg systems. There is no way there can be a blanket policy that applies to every kind of prosthetic socket. There are many amputees who can ride specific rides very safely.

Can you go to Thorpe Park with a broken arm? ›

Guests with broken limbs or casts are not permitted to ride on either Nemesis Inferno or The Swarm, for their own safety and the safety of others.

Can you go on rides at Alton Towers with a cast? ›

Guests with any type of cast are restricted from riding our attractions. Please see each individual ride section for more information. Walking boots and braces are permitted on some rides providing they are fully secured.

Are prosthetic arms waterproof? ›

For many patients the thought of having to remove their prosthesis every time they need to take a bath, shower, or enjoy some fun outdoor water activities just isn't realistic. However, the average prosthetic device is not waterproof.

Can a person swim with one leg? ›

“Persisting through it for probably six months, with the help of lifeguards, I've perfected my own stroke now. I can actually go and swim straight using one arm and one leg. I can swim further than I can walk. “It's changed my life completely.

How do amputees swim? ›

The standard swim leg has holes (see right) in the outer shell. These holes allow the limb to fill with water, reducing buoyancy while swimming, and enable water to drain from it after the amputee leaves the water.

What are the 4 types of prosthetics? ›

When talking about prosthetics and artificial limbs, it's important to note the differences between the various types and their specific uses. There are usually four main types to consider: transradial, transfemoral, transtibial, and transhumeral.

What happens if you wear a prosthetic for too long? ›

Stump skin often becomes macerated or worn away by poor prosthetic fit or alignment. As a result of long continued rubbing the skin becomes thickened and leathery. There can occur scaling, redness, oedema, fissuring or erosions.

What body parts can be replaced with a prosthetic? ›

The artificial parts that are most commonly thought of as prostheses are those that replace lost arms and legs, but bone, artery, and heart valve replacements are common (see artificial organ), and artificial eyes and teeth are also correctly termed prostheses.

How long do prosthetics last? ›

A well-made prosthesis can last anywhere from a few months to a few years; three years is about average. However, the lifespan of a prosthesis will depend on several factors, and it varies for each patient.

How long can you wear a prosthetic? ›

How often will I have to get my prosthesis replaced? That depends on your activity level and how well you take care of your prosthesis. A rule of thumb is from two to four years.

How Much Do prosthetic legs weigh? ›

Some of the most popular myoelectric prosthetic arms weigh in at over three pounds. For context, that's the weight of over seven iPhones. When you think about living life with that much extra weight at the end of your residual limb, it's easy to see why weight can become an issue.

How far can you walk with a prosthetic leg? ›

The distance that patients can walk ranges depending on where their amputation is and how long they've had with the prosthetic. Generally speaking, the median distance that someone with a lower limb amputation could walk was about 67 meters which equates to about 219 feet.

How long does it take to make a prosthetic leg? ›

The design, custom fabrication and fitting of your prosthesis will normally take 3-6 weeks. It takes an average of 3 or 4 visits with your prosthetist to get the right socket fit and to prepare you to use your prosthesis.

How does a prosthetic leg stay on? ›

The socket is a precise mold of your residual limb that fits snugly over the limb. It helps attach the prosthetic leg to your body. The suspension system is how the prosthesis stays attached, whether through sleeve suction, vacuum suspension/suction or distal locking through pin or lanyard.

Can you ride rides with a cast? ›

You will be enjoying your magical vacation in no time. In my experience, most rides can accommodate someone with their arm in a cast, but you will want to check with your doctor prior to your visit to see if there are certain things you should avoid. Water rides, spinning attractions, thrill rides, etc.

Can you ride roller coasters at Disney with a cast? ›

Guests have to step down in order to board some attractions like Space Mountain and Rock 'n' Roller Coaster. Cast Members are not allowed to physically lift guests so keep that in mind. If your teenager doesn't have any problems with any of these, then they should be able to ride.

Can you go on Universal rides with a cast? ›

Attraction is not recommended for guests wearing casts. Attraction is not recommended for recent surgery or other conditions that may be aggravated by this ride. Prosthetic limbs should be secured to prevent hazards or loss due to ride forces. One natural leg must fit underneath the shin guard.

Do disabled people get fast track? ›

As such, we are happy to help guests who are unable to queue for long periods of time to access the attraction quicker if necessary. Please just speak to a member of our admissions team if you feel you will struggle to queue outside for any length of time, or head to the Fast track entrance.

Can 13 year olds go to Thorpe Park on their own? ›

Our Resort regulations state: No child or children under the age of 12 will be admitted to the Attraction unless they are accompanied by an adult aged 18 years or over and such child or children whilst on site must remain under the control or supervision of an adult at all times.

What is the weight limit at Thorpe Park? ›

Thorpe Park, a theme park in the UK, states that there is a maximum weight of 20 stone to ride their water slide, Depth Charge, in the park's accessibility guide. Most of the theme park's other attractions are judged by size of chest rather than weight if they have a size restriction.

Is there a weight limit on Alton Towers rides? ›

Please be aware: Spinball Whizzer has a maximum weight limit of 111kg.
...
How restrictive are the restraints on the rides?
Galactica48 inches
TH13TEENRestrictive, please speak to a member of staff
Spinball WhizzerRestrictive, please speak to a member of staff
Wicker ManRestrictive, please speak to a member of staff
4 more rows

Can you ride a rollercoaster with one arm? ›

Riders with one missing arm or hand may ride, provided rider has ability to hold on with one functioning hand and brace themselves with two functioning legs.

Can I ride a roller coaster with a broken arm? ›

Guests with casts below the elbow or knee are permitted to ride some rides as long as they do not get in the way of the ride's safety devices, other rides do not allow casts at all.

What metal is used for prosthesis? ›

A variety of metals are used for prosthetics limbs; Aluminum, Titanium, Magnesium, Copper, Steel, and many more. They are each used in a varied amount and for various applications, either pure or alloyed.

What are prosthetics made of? ›

A wide variety of materials are used to create the actual limb, including acrylic resin, carbon fiber, thermoplastics, silicone, aluminum, and titanium. To create a life-like appearance, a foam cover can be applied and shaped to match the real limb.

Why is Aluminium used for prosthetics? ›

Aluminum. Aluminum alloys are well suited for orthotics and prosthetics because of their high strength/weight ratio and resistance to corrosion.

Do prosthetic legs rust? ›

Water can rust a prosthetic limb and can damage the sensitive mechanical components.

Can you swim if you have no legs? ›

You may be wondering…how do you swim if you don't have legs? Well, Spencer uses his arms instead! Without his legs to weigh him down, he's much lighter in the water, and can do freestyle, backstroke and breaststroke well. Butterfly can be a challenge, since the legs drive a lot of the stroke's power.

How much does the fin prosthetic cost? ›

Provided at no cost to Mr. Lasko, The Fin won't be available to the public for at least another six months. So far, the cost of this prosthetic is expected to run between $2,000 and $5,000, depending on what levels of customization are needed. To find out more on The Fin, then check out their website here.

Can a double amputee swim? ›

Bilateral BK amputees may be able to swim without any devices but find it difficult to walk up to the edge of the swimming pool. Socket devices have been devised which allow the bilateral amputee to walk to the swimming pool and swim with them on.

How does an amputee take a shower? ›

A water-resistant chair or bench is ideal for shower or bath use because it allows you to sit at a normal height while washing. A bench that extends to the outside of the tub will enable you to sit down and then slide to the inside of the tub.

Can amputees drive? ›

People with all levels of limb loss or limb difference can still drive a car. Depending on the level or type of limb loss or limb difference as well as your use or non-use of a prosthesis, you may need to choose an automatic transmission.

What is the most common prosthetic? ›

Common prosthetic fillings include silicone gel, foam, and fiberfill. Foam and fiberfill are lightweight options, while silicone is a more realistic option. Silicone prostheses (L8600) were another common procedure in 2021, totaling 6,034 procedures.

What is the benefit of prosthetics? ›

When an arm or other extremity is amputated or lost, a prosthetic device, or prosthesis, can play an important role in rehabilitation. For many people, an artificial limb can improve mobility and the ability to manage daily activities, as well as provide the means to stay independent.

What is the purpose of prosthetics? ›

What are prostheses? A prosthesis substitutes for a part of the body that may have been missing at birth, or that is lost in an accident or through amputation. Many amputees have lost a limb as part of treatment for cancer, diabetes or severe infection.

Why can't you sleep with a prosthetic leg? ›

Take off Your Prosthesis Limb

It is essential to take off a prosthetic limb before going to bed each night. Sleeping with a prosthesis on can cause injuries to the limb caused by awkward sleep positions or constant pressure on the limb from the prosthetic device.

Can prosthetics break? ›

Importance of the Socket

They will also work with patients as they learn to use the device and as they age — prosthetic parts may break down, the amputated limb may change in size over time, and a patient may also experience skin conditions caused by movement of the socket.

How often do prosthetics need to be replaced? ›

The Medicare guidelines allow for replacement every six months if needed. Prosthetic Feet are typically replaced every 3 to 5 years depending on patient functional (activity) changes, weight changes, and ADL's (activities of daily living). Feet typically come with a 3-year warranty.

What is the difference between prosthetic and prosthesis? ›

A prosthesis is a man-made substitute for a missing body part (just one is called a prosthesis and is also often called a prosthetic; the plural is prostheses). Sometimes, a part of the body must be removed if cancer is found there. Sometimes getting treatment might result in hair loss.

When was the first prosthetic made? ›

The earliest known prosthesis, dating possibly as far back as 950 B.C., was discovered in Cairo on the mummified body of an ancient Egyptian noblewoman. The prosthesis is made largely of wood, molded and stained, its components bound together with leather thread.

Who makes prosthesis? ›

What is a prosthetist? A prosthetist is a healthcare professional who makes and fits artificial limbs (prostheses) for people with disabilities.

Can a person swim with one leg? ›

“Persisting through it for probably six months, with the help of lifeguards, I've perfected my own stroke now. I can actually go and swim straight using one arm and one leg. I can swim further than I can walk. “It's changed my life completely.

How does an amputee take a shower? ›

A water-resistant chair or bench is ideal for shower or bath use because it allows you to sit at a normal height while washing. A bench that extends to the outside of the tub will enable you to sit down and then slide to the inside of the tub.

Can you sleep with a prosthetic leg? ›

Once you have completed the wearing schedule, you can wear the prosthesis all day, but never at night while sleeping.

Can prosthetic hands get wet? ›

These types of devices are usually water-resistant, meaning they can be washed the same as a sound hand – just don't soak them in water, and if the device gets saltwater on it, be sure to rinse with fresh water.

How do amputees swim? ›

The standard swim leg has holes (see right) in the outer shell. These holes allow the limb to fill with water, reducing buoyancy while swimming, and enable water to drain from it after the amputee leaves the water.

How can I swim without my legs? ›

How to Swim WITHOUT KICKING! - YouTube

Can you swim if you have no legs? ›

You may be wondering…how do you swim if you don't have legs? Well, Spencer uses his arms instead! Without his legs to weigh him down, he's much lighter in the water, and can do freestyle, backstroke and breaststroke well. Butterfly can be a challenge, since the legs drive a lot of the stroke's power.

Why cant you sleep with a prosthetic on? ›

When you are trying to sleep, though, a prosthetic limb does not offer any benefit. It only gets in the way of sleeping comfortably. Secondly, you should not sleep with a prosthetic limb because it can cause injury. Everyone has slept in an awkward position and woke up with a kink or sore spot.

How far can you walk with a prosthetic leg? ›

The distance that patients can walk ranges depending on where their amputation is and how long they've had with the prosthetic. Generally speaking, the median distance that someone with a lower limb amputation could walk was about 67 meters which equates to about 219 feet.

How does a prosthetic leg stay on? ›

The socket is a precise mold of your residual limb that fits snugly over the limb. It helps attach the prosthetic leg to your body. The suspension system is how the prosthesis stays attached, whether through sleeve suction, vacuum suspension/suction or distal locking through pin or lanyard.

How long do prosthetics last? ›

A well-made prosthesis can last anywhere from a few months to a few years; three years is about average. However, the lifespan of a prosthesis will depend on several factors, and it varies for each patient.

What happens if you wear a prosthetic for too long? ›

Stump skin often becomes macerated or worn away by poor prosthetic fit or alignment. As a result of long continued rubbing the skin becomes thickened and leathery. There can occur scaling, redness, oedema, fissuring or erosions.

How many hours a day can you wear a prosthetic leg? ›

If you are a new amputee, your shrinker should be worn 23 hours a day, except when you are bathing or washing the residual limb. If you have been an amputee and now have a prosthesis, you should wear your shrinker only while sleeping at night.

How do you clean a prosthetic arm? ›

You can usually use soap on a body-powered device. Be sure to wipe your prosthetic socket (the inside) at the end of the day, rinse well to remove any soap residue, then make sure to either use compressed air to dry it or let it dry in a way where any water can drain and evaporate completely.

How do you clean a prosthetic hand? ›

After removing the prosthesis, it should be cleaned every night with warm water and soap, then rinsed thoroughly with Isopropyl Rubbing Alcohol both inside and out. This will eliminate any lotion residue, absorbed perspiration and odors.

How do you clean silicone prosthetics? ›

Washing your prosthetic liners

Use a drop or two of soap and apply it thoroughly. Rub gently to remove any debris that has built up inside. Run warm water over it and rinse well until there is no soap residue left. You can also wash the outside of the liner.

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